Featured Stories

UK @ the Half: Arny Stromberg, Department of Statistics

UK @ the Half: Arny Stromberg, Department of Statistics

Statistics and Pharmacy Collaborate on Study Showing Cell Signaling Interaction May Prevent Key Step in Lung Cancer Progression

By Kristie Colon

L to R: James Collard, Katherine Thompson, Penni Black, Madeline Krentz Gober

New findings from University of Kentucky faculty published in Scientific Reports reveals a novel cell signaling interaction that may prevent a key step in lung cancer progression.

Statistics Reunion 2017

September 15 - 16, 2017

The Statistics Alumni Board cordially invites you to a reunion weekend. Come see what’s new in the department and on campus!

Participants

Stromberg Named Fellow of American Statistical Association

By Jenny Wells

Arnold Stromberg, professor and chair of the Department of Statistics in the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences, has been named a fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA).

The honor is conferred upon less than one percent of the ASA’s membership, and is comprised of statisticians from academia, business, government and research organizations from around the world.

Some Intersections of Art and Science

Date: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016 - 7:30pm to 8:30pm
Location: 
Memorial Hall
Tags/Keywords:

“Some Intersections of Art and Science”

 Prof. Frank Wilczek, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 Public lecture: Thursday, April 28, 7:30 pm, Memorial Hall 

Abstract: There are profound reasons, rooted in the nature of human cognition and perception, why art and science have a lot to offer one another.   I will display some important historical examples of their synergy, and point out some emerging opportunities.  Several striking images are an integral part of the presentation. 

Frank Wilczek is an American theoretical physicist, mathematician, and Nobel laureate.  He is the Herman Feshbach Professor of Physics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Along with David Gross and H. David Politzer, Wilczek was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics (2004) for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of strong interaction.

Wilczek's lecture is free and open to the general public.   A book signing will follow. 

This event is supported by the Departments of Physics and Astronomy, Mathematics, Statistics, Chemistry, the College of Engineering, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School, and the Vice President for Research.  The organizers thank the  Dr. J. C. Eaves Undergraduate Excellence Fund in Mathematics and  Milton Huffaker for their generous support. 

 

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