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Voice after Exit: Perspectives from the Hong Kong Diaspora

 

Flyer for the event

In the aftermath of the 2019 anti-authoritarian movement in Hong Kong, the Chinese government abruptly implemented the National Security Law, which criminalizes dissents and protests against the government. Since then, the Hong Kong government has been engaged in mass arrests and the ongoing persecution of pro-democracy activists, lawmakers, and journalists. As a result of these crackdowns, many activists have gone into exile, seeking asylum in countries such as the US, UK, Australia, Canada, and Germany. As the National Security Law further clamps down on the freedom of speech and other civil liberties in Hong Kong, many Hongkongers have also opted to emigrate. This proposed panel responses to the current wave of exile and emigration from Hong Kong. Moderated by Dr. Emily Beaulieu Bacchus (Political Science, International Studies), this panel event brings together three activist-researchers from the Hong Kong diaspora who will discuss how diasporic Hongkongers construct a collective identity, engage in advocacy, and exercise their political agency in a transnational context despite the constant threat of state persecution. 

Speakers:

Glacier Chung Ching Kwong is a political activist from Hong Kong. She is currently the Digital Rights Research Fellow at Hong Kong Democracy Council (HKDC), a leading organization for the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong and HongKongers overseas led by fellow activist Samuel Chu. Previously, she was the spokesperson of the non-governmental organization (NGO) Keyboard Frontline, monitoring privacy abuses and censorship on the web.

Maggie Shum is a research and program associate of the Global Policy Initiative in the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. She earned a PhD in political science from Notre Dame, specializing in comparative politics with a regional focus in Latin America, Brazil, and Hong Kong. She is interested in participatory policies, policy diffusion, political party organizations, contentious politics, and elections. She also is conducting the survey research project “Hong Kong Voices in American Politics,” which focuses on Hong Kong-Americans’ political attitudes in the 2020 US election.

Kennedy Chi-pan Wong is a Ph.D. student in sociology at the University of Southern California. As an international student who is born and raised in Hong Kong, Kennedy is deeply interested in how immigrants construct the concept of "diaspora" as a "transnational project" to support the resistance in their homeland. Kennedy is conducting ethnographic field research on the Hong Kong immigrant groups in the United States that support the resistance in their homeland. In particular, Kennedy examines how people construct diaspora as a project to sustain their political commitment and participation in both host and home country. In dialogue with the diasporic mobilization literature, this study aims at exploring the theoretical intersections between inclusion-exclusion boundary making, nationalism, transnationalism, and international relations.

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https://uky.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_CK_J1ZAaRYqRWPQRBu92NA
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“Lunch & Learn” with Dr. Samuel Roberts

Dr. Roberts will have a “Lunch & Learn” event with undergraduates in 1545 POT on the topic of “Your College Career as Training for the World of Advocacy and Organizing.” RSVP to Justin.conder@uky.edu as space is limited to 20 students.  

 

Dr. Samuel Kelton Roberts, Jr., is Director of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS), Associate Professor of History (School of Arts & Sciences) and Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences (Mailman School of Public Health). He writes, teaches, and lectures widely on African-American history, medical and public health history, urban history, issues of policing and criminal justice, and the history of social movements. His book, Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation (UNC Press, 2009), demonstrates the historical and continuing links between legal and de facto segregation and poor health outcomes. In 2013-14, Dr. Roberts served as the Policy Director of Columbia University’s Justice Initiative, where he coordinated the efforts of several partners to bring attention to the issue of aging and the growing incarcerated elderly population. This work led to the publication of the widely-read landmark report, Aging in Prison Reducing Elder Incarceration and Promoting Public Safety (New York: Columbia University Center for Justice. November 2015).

Dr. Roberts currently is researching a book project on the history of drug addiction policy and politics from the 1950s to the present, a period which encompasses the various heroin epidemics between the 1950s and the 1980s, therapeutic communities, radical recovery movements, methadone maintenance treatment, and harm reduction approaches.

Dr. Roberts tweets from @SamuelKRoberts.

 
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Patterson Office Tower, Room 1545
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“Breakfast & Learn” with Dr. Samuel Roberts

Dr. Roberts will have a “Breakfast & Learn” event with graduate students in 1545 POT on the topic of “Diversity and Graduate and Faculty Development.” RSVP to Justin.conder@uky.edu as space is limited to 20 students.

 

Dr. Samuel Kelton Roberts, Jr., is Director of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS), Associate Professor of History (School of Arts & Sciences) and Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences (Mailman School of Public Health). He writes, teaches, and lectures widely on African-American history, medical and public health history, urban history, issues of policing and criminal justice, and the history of social movements. His book, Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation (UNC Press, 2009), demonstrates the historical and continuing links between legal and de facto segregation and poor health outcomes. In 2013-14, Dr. Roberts served as the Policy Director of Columbia University’s Justice Initiative, where he coordinated the efforts of several partners to bring attention to the issue of aging and the growing incarcerated elderly population. This work led to the publication of the widely-read landmark report, Aging in Prison Reducing Elder Incarceration and Promoting Public Safety (New York: Columbia University Center for Justice. November 2015).

Dr. Roberts currently is researching a book project on the history of drug addiction policy and politics from the 1950s to the present, a period which encompasses the various heroin epidemics between the 1950s and the 1980s, therapeutic communities, radical recovery movements, methadone maintenance treatment, and harm reduction approaches.

Dr. Roberts tweets from @SamuelKRoberts.

 
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Location:
Patterson Office Tower, Room 1545
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CANCELLED "Melanated Matriculation: A Panel Discussion” and "Resiliency and Authenticity"

Part of the Africana Saturday School Double Lecture Series.

Chesmore Montique, Jonathan Davies, and Manielle Workman present "Melanated Matriculation: A Panel Discussion,” with Brian Hamilton as moderator.
 
The second hour features Dr. Ricky Jones' presentation, "Resiliency and Authenticity."
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Lyric Theater & Cultural Arts Center
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CANCELLED Women in Military Panel cebe242 Wed, 01/29/2020 - 10:24 am
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TBD (Time TBD)
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“Drugs, Politics, and Pariahs: Or, How to Think Historically About Race and Harm Reduction in an Opioid Epidemic”

Dr. Samuel Kelton Roberts, Jr., is Director of Columbia University’s Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS), Associate Professor of History (School of Arts & Sciences) and Associate Professor of Sociomedical Sciences (Mailman School of Public Health). He writes, teaches, and lectures widely on African-American history, medical and public health history, urban history, issues of policing and criminal justice, and the history of social movements. His book, Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation (UNC Press, 2009), demonstrates the historical and continuing links between legal and de facto segregation and poor health outcomes. In 2013-14, Dr. Roberts served as the Policy Director of Columbia University’s Justice Initiative, where he coordinated the efforts of several partners to bring attention to the issue of aging and the growing incarcerated elderly population. This work led to the publication of the widely-read landmark report, Aging in Prison Reducing Elder Incarceration and Promoting Public Safety (New York: Columbia University Center for Justice. November 2015).

Dr. Roberts currently is researching a book project on the history of drug addiction policy and politics from the 1950s to the present, a period which encompasses the various heroin epidemics between the 1950s and the 1980s, therapeutic communities, radical recovery movements, methadone maintenance treatment, and harm reduction approaches.

Dr. Roberts tweets from @SamuelKRoberts.

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Senate Chamber, Gatton Student Center
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