Long Time Ago... A Performance by Crit Callebs Eastern Band Cherokee Storyteller

Crit Callebs (Eastern Band Cherokee descendant) is a traditional hunter, food gatherer, and fire-tender and lives on the Yakama Nation Indian Reservation. He is completing his Master’s Degree at Central Washington University (CWU) in Cultural Resource Management with an expertise in treaty rights concerning Indian hunting and fishing. He served as the Native American Liaison at the Center for Diversity and Social Justice and was a very popular guest lecturer for the American Indian Studies program. Crit is a trainer for the “Since Time Immemorial” tribal sovereignty and history curriculum implemented in K-12 classrooms in Washington State. As an active member of the Northwest Indian Storytelling Association he has been a featured storyteller for the Tseil-Waututh Nation, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, Colville Tribes Youth “Warrior Camp” and is the 2014 Alaska Spirit of Reading storyteller. Crit is also a professional survival trainer and former instructor for the world renowned Boulder Outdoors Survival School. One of his great passions is teaching youth and adults how to be self-reliant in the wilderness. Using his gift of storytelling, he travels throughout the U.S. and Canada sharing traditional stories, teaching cultural camps and conducting workshops that promote self-awareness, ancestral skills, and Indigenous values.
Wednesday, October 29, 2014 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm
The Niles Gallery -- Lucille Fine Arts Library

Confucianism and Contemporary Culture: Media, Politics, Society, Spirituality

2:00 PM Panel Presentation
Julia K. Murray (Univeristy of Wisconsin-Madison)

2:45 PM Panel Presentation
Kenneth J Hammond (New Mexico State University)

3:30 PM Panel Presentation
Mayfair Yang (University of California - Santa Barbara)

4:15 PM Q&A with Panelists

Saturday, November 16, 2013 - 2:00pm to 4:15pm
Niles Gallery University of Kentucky


Confucianism and Contemporary Culture: Media, Politics, Society, Spirituality

5:30 PM Introductions
Huajing Maske (UKCI) and Jeffrey L. Richey (Berea College)

5:45 PM Keynote Address
On-Cho NG (Pennsylvania State University)
"Interpreting Confucianism in the West"

6:30 PM Q&A with Dr. Ng

7:00 PM Public Reception

7:30 Film He Ni Zai Yiqi (Together)
Introduction: Jeffrey L. Richey, "Seeing Confucianism in Chen Kaige's Together"

9:30 Presenters Response:
Audience comments and questions


Friday, November 15, 2013 - 5:30pm to 9:30pm
Niles Gallery University of Kentucky


Event to Explore Interdisciplinary Nature of the Humanities and Arts

The African American and Africana Studies Program (AAAS) at the University of Kentucky and the Department of Modern & Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MCLLC) have combined forces to organize a special event, In Search of our Hearth: Reinventing the Odyssey, which will take place April 19-20 at various campus locations.

David Crabbe

David Crabbe, a graduate student in the Division of Classics in the Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures and Cultures has been awarded the Swift-Longacre-Scaife Fellowship for academic year 2012-13, in the amount of $6,000. The award was made in recognition both of what David had already accomplished in the Classics program and for his outstanding promise as a career Latin teacher.

Saying Sayonara To Kentucky

University of Kentucky graduate Amber Anderson traces her love of Japanese culture to childhood cartoons. “I remember watching TV at 10 or 11 years old and really enjoying Japanese animation,” she said.

Robert Wagoner

Robert Wagoner was an undergraduate and graduate student in Classics at the University of Kentucky. He earned a BA in Classics and Philosophy in 2002, and an MA in Classics and a Graduate Certificate in Latin Studies in 2004. As a graduate student at UK, Robert pursued both Greek and Latin studies.

Classics Awarded Graduate School Academic Year Fellowship

By: Jonathon Spalding

For two millennia the leading intellects of Western Europe expressed their most sophisticated thoughts in a language that is now largely considered extinct.

Reed DeMarco

Reed DeMarco was born outside of Detroit, MI and earned his B.A. in Classics from Wayne State University in Detroit in 2007. He was then awarded a teaching assistantship for his graduate studies at the University of Kentucky, finishing his degree in 2009. After Kentucky, Reed moved back to Michigan to pursue a teaching certification at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids.

Erika Peck Bucciantini

When my students ask me why I became a Latin teacher, I often tell them it was fate. This, obviously, is the short answer I give during class time when they have asked an off-topic question to avoid conjugating deponent verbs or learning about gerunds and gerundives. The truth of the matter is that I have grown to love the Latin language and couldn’t imagine my life without it.


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